London International Animation Festival draws near

August 16, 2010

Now in its seventh year, the London International Animation Festival will run from 27 August to 5 September 2010. The statistics are impressive, in ten days the festival will show 250 films in 26 programs selected from over 2,000 entries from 30 countries.

A statement on the LIAF website tells us “the LIAF aims to challenge and inspire audiences with thematic, visual and technical diversity from award winners, outstanding industry veterans and those wonderful newcomers who are exploring their talent on screen for the very first time”.

One of the most popular programmes features the best of recently released British animated shorts. Before the screening, some of the filmmakers who created the films will talk about their work. Among the films are:

Cooked
Jens Blank
2010, 6’45
The story of an unlikely love triangle that springs between a walrus a seal and a lobster in an arctic sauna.

The Grand Easter Egg Hunt
Linda McCarthy
2010, 8’20
It is Easter at Small Birds Singing and the Unbelievable family are looking forward to their traditional Grand Egg Hunt.

Speechless
Daniel Greaves
2009, 7’00
A family of six sits down for a microwave meal. They communicate using technology but one of them is determined for a return to a traditional supper; good food and real conversation.

The nine International programmes have the best recently released films selected from 2000+ entries received from all over the world. These screenings are the backbone of the festival line-up and will give a current overview of the incredibly diverse, eclectic and vibrant independent animation scene. Here are some entries from the digital section:

Logorama
H5
France, 2009, 16’15
Academy Award-winner produced by Autour de Minuit. An over-marketed world built of logotypes. A dramatic taking of hostages by a corporate symbol gone rogue. A giant Californian earthquake. A shaky world built on simple symbols with complex connotations.

The Kinematograph
Tomek Baginski
Poland, 2009, 12’10
Francis, a humble clerk and a self-taught inventor, had it all, it seemed: a big house in a small town, a lot of free time and a loving wife. But…

The Trembling Veil of Bones
Matthew Talbot-Kelly
Canada, 2010, 12’42
Live-action and computer-generated imagery are combined to tell the story of a solitary clockmaker forced to confront his past in a densely layered world of intrigue and revelation.

Visit the LIAF website for more information.

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